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20100101
20100131
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 16
WMPT (PBS) 12
WETA 10
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English 38
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
fascinated with sau arabia? >> well, the oious is 9/11 for america. 15 of the 19 hijackersre saudis. i tried expla in my book w it was basically a sdi quarrel fought out on american soil with american victims. al qaeda, bin lad dedicated t bringg down the house of saad codn't do it in saudi arabia with the near enemy a they called him so they came to america d attacked the far enemy. you paid the priceor your ars of friendship a closeness with sdi abia. tavis: i was about to a why did wend up being at the top that list. yoexplain it now. you talk about i in the book, the price tt we had to pay f our friendship with the saudis. >> well, it's america who exploited, discored and deveped saudi oil. back in e 1930's, the saudi ose america rather than the british rather than us becse we had bee meddling in th middle east. the kingf saudi araa at the me liked the idea that america werear away. they would come and devel the oil and go ay. america is on the otheride of the worl afr the war, e second world war, suddenl saudi arabia discered that america ia patron of this new jewish state in the middl
arabia? >> well, the obvious is 9/11 for america. 15 of the 19 hijackers are saudis. i tried to explain in my book how it was basically a saudi quarrel fought out on american soil with american victims. al qaeda, bin laden dedicated to bringing down the house of saad couldn't do it in saudi arabia with the near enemy as they called him so they came to america and attacked the far enemy. you paid the price for your years of friendship and closeness with saudi arabia. tavis: i was about to ask why did we end up being at the top of that list. you explain it now. you talk about it in the book, the price that we had to pay for our friendship with the saudis. >> well, it's america who exploited, discovered and developed saudi oil. back in the 1930's, the saudis chose america rather than the british, rather than us because we had been meddling in the middle east. the king of saudi arabia at the time liked the idea that america were far away. they would come and develop the oil and go away. america is on the other side of the world. after the war, the second world war, suddenly, saudi arabia di
known black people in america to come to such a place of determination about how to face the conditions under which they were living. segregation. no right to vote. bad employment. lower or second class schooling. all of the above. and in dr. king's voice, i not only heard the passion but i also heard some clarity that the mission would not be short-term. that he was going for the long haul and not since the days of dr. dubois that i heard anybody speak with such affirmation and conviction. about our plight. tavis: what did you make of him on a personal level? obviously you have shared with us that you were taken by his presentation and by his commitment to the cause but what did you make of him on your first meeting on a personal level? >> first of all, i knew that he was 26 and i'm looking into the face of this 26-year-old, it was very difficult for me to fathom that he understood and knew so much. his maturity was well beyond his years and his academic information was well beyond the amount of schooling that he had had although he was already the possessor of a ph.d. he had done not
are against, but what you are for. the brilliance of your contract with america back in 1994 is that you had the presence of mind to lay out for the american people, whether they agreed or disagreed, you laid out an agenda of 10 things that you and your party would do if america gave you the chance to run the house. you were for something, as opposed to simply being against something. where is that in the part of your party right now? >> id is not covered as much because of the nature of the news media and because republicans do not push it hard enough. john boehner's plan was pretty good, they had a pretty good health plan that was modest within the congressional budget office, but to get anything covered like that, you have got to be maniacal in talking about it until all of your friends think that you are crazy and the average person is just beginning to hear you. republicans do not quite have the discipline and focus to say on these topics the way that they should. another point on which i agree with you entirely, i have an article coming out next month where i outline a new approach to
that come from? i do not know. it is fun. it is just fun. race is the most important thing in america. it really is. what i get out of an audience in 15 minutes a psychiatrist cannot get out of them in 15 years. you'll sit and listen about sex, religion, you think things are taboo, and they will sit there and listen and will not open their mouths, do not respond. but you talk about race and will flip in five, 10 minutes. >> why is race a fertile ground to navigate? >> because america is caught up in it. we are a melting pot. there are so many different nationalities, so many different races, people of different colors, it is just fun. tavis: when people think that you are being in politics, paul is being kilobit and politic -- paul is being a little bit incorrect, what you say? >> i am a comedian. people are like saints. we make people's lives better. it is true, without us, you guys would be miserable. especially in the political arena now. our economy, the way the world is, we need comedians. tavis: where does paul mooney find funny? >> in life. the funny it is in life. it is in thi
that co from? i do not know. is fun. it is justun. race is themost important thing in america. it reallys. what i get out of an audience in 15 minutes psychiatrist cannot t out of them in 15 years. you'll s and listen out sex, relion, you think thingsre taboo, and ty will sit there d listen a will not open their mouths, do t resnd. but you talkbout race and wi flip in five, minutes. whys race a fertile ground to navigate? >> because america is caught up in it. we are a melting p. there soany different nationalities, soany different races, people of different colors, it is just fun tavis:hen people think that you are being litics, paul is being kilobit and politic -- pauls bei a little bit incorrect,hat you say? >> i am a comedn. people are like saints. we ma people's lives better. it is true, without us, yo guys would be miserable. especially in the political ara now our economy, the way the world is, we need comedians. vis: where does ul mooney find fny? >> in life. the funny it is in life. it is in this mome now, being with you. when i leave her i will b talking abouyou. that is what
outn agenda of 10 things that yound yourarty wouldof america ga you thechance to run the house. you were for something,s opposed to simply bng agast somethin where is that in the part of your party right now? >> id is not covered as much because of t nature of the news mediand because republicans do not push it hard engh. john boehner's an w pretty good, theyad a pretty good health plan that w modst withinhe congressional budget office, but to get anhing covered li that, youave got to b maniacain talkingbout it until all ofour friends thk that you are crazy and the average person is just beginning hearyou. republicans not quite have ediscipline andocus to sa on these tops the w that they should. another point on which i agr with you entirely, i have a article coming out xt mth where i outline a new apprch to t contract with ameri for the congrsional republicans. make the case stronglthat yocan the alternative governing party and bvery succesul, but i do not think you can be thepposition rty and very successful. it is imptant for republicans tonderstand at the great victors in new
say we extended grays a they are not extending greece to anyone else. it turns out bank of america has so much money in bonuses it could have absolves the crisis for 2 million people, but they gave 100 loans. we fired bank of america. it is now a mini movement to move your money. the banks say they are too big to fail. i say make them smaller. in wall street there is a morality play going on. i think it is a cultural thing. greed is good. it is all about me, and i want it now. those messages destroyed economies but also cultures and our souls. i counter that with enough is enough. we are in this together. we evaluate decisions today. that would change things. >> i see greed is a good concept on wall street. what role do we play in rediscovering? >> my depression-era parents would not have spent money they did not have, and wells may not trickle-down, but bad values do. we have got to look at wall street, too. also, at ourselves, look in the mirror. crisis gives such it -- gives us a chance to reset. all of the pain and suffering in detroit is going to be in vain if we go back to busine
of bt sells. including "america sketches." heoins us tonight from washington good t have you ba on the program. >> and gooto be back wh you. tas: let me start b asking whher or n to yourind the were any immedte compasons, or not so immediate comparisons, that you drew between what we in towd with hurricane katrinan new orleans and ate are seeing in haiti as we speak. >> let me start with a good ings. there isomething about the human heart that has benevolence, compassion. when somhing is happening to somne else thatis bad, pople want to help peoplare still coming into new orlns to help. that was the same instinct in iti. the darker side of itin new orleans whether it was that the state level, the national lvel, or the loc vel, like you did not have great governance. you do not hav people worki togher efficiently in the vernment. likewise we have tt oblem in haiti. we talk about leadship i lot. bothof those situations prove that good leadership mters. tas: it does mter, but as good learship matter only during a isis? or before you get in? there culd heeen better leadershipon ever
of race. tavis: in the most multi can -- multi-cultural, multi-ethnic america ever, this is not about race. what is the challenge for great leaders, for creative thinkers? for those people that, down the road and, we will call heroes? >> you look at the diversity of a town like new orleans. whether it was 100 years ago when louis armstrong grow up, taken in by the jewish family, of playing the music of gospel, plantations, creoles, marching bands and everything else, that makes the spanish, french, creole, american, black and white, it created great food and great music. that is the sound of our creativity. you look at that notion of celebrating that -- benjamin franklin did, during his lifetime he donated to the building fund of each and every church in philadelphia. at one point he said even if constantinople came here to teach us about islam, we should offer them a place that we might learn. he was the largest contributor to the synagogue in philadelphia when he was on his deathbed. it is that a multi-ethnic society that america has given the world. it is what we are fighting for today.
of america around the world. i think if you could give him credit for one significant success, in his first year, it is that america is perceived very differently in europe and i think in the muslim world, the cairo speech and other speech hes gave began to reach out to the muslim world in a way that i think no other american president has. the problem he faces on the foreign front is that 2010 now has to be the year of deliverables. that's difficult. he reached out to iran and the iranians didn't reach back. he's committed 30,000 american troops, plus another 20 that he did earlier in his term, to afghanistan. but we won't know until the middle of this year at the earliest whether that's turning the tide. >> i heard you suggest, just a few moments ago, that you don't think personally as the chief washington correspondent for the new york times, you don't feel that he spent too little time on the economy, but that doesn't -- that doesn't square well with the polls and surveys i'm reading about what the american people think, david. >> that's right. there's also a difference between the amou
in the future of america is a medium six. there will be about six companies with somewhere between 18%-20% of the car market, whereas gm is to have half of the car market and everybody split the rest. there will be more technology, plug-in hybrids, all-electric cars, a lot of different things that cannot be a follow the leader game as it used to be, if you will. for policymakers, the lessons are if you're going to intervene in private industry, a, make sure there is a critical need for it. there was a crisis in the economy last year, arguably still lives, but not as bad as it was, not in free fall. the second thing is, the wind, have tough terms, get in and get out. do not continue the drip of corporate welfare for years and decades. tavis: pulitzer prize-winning author of the booked "crash course -- the amerin thank you for being on the program. >> thank you. tavis: up next, actress keri russell. stay with us. pleased to welcome keri russell back to this program. the globe poll -- the gloat -- the golden globe and winning actress is back with her new film, "extraordinary measures," s
. there are obviously references to vieam, iraq,american colial period. we have a hiory, and not just america, the freh, spanish, enish, the portugue- invang and taking what we need. we for out indigenous cultures and sometimes wipe them out completely. we don't have truly indigens cultures lef in this world. therre few in the amazon or in thenew inea. some of them are going tinct on a daily basis i sortof extrapolate it even further, thisidea of entitlement. we take wha we need, and we don't ve back. we have the sta giving back. we ha to startggressively expecting -- accepting our responsibility. tavi had to give theroper treatment to the issues that you have laid out? as a filmmaker, i assume you want us tomarinate on some of these things beyond the theater experience. how do you do thawithout being eachy? >> it is a fine lin you have donto put holes spoonfs of sugar inthere, peoe coming out saying tt they cried three times. having this emotional reaction. that is part of it. don't assume that you have to give people infmation. assume th they have got the information already. what we will give you is
telling stories that way because to me, one of the things we lost in america, used to be especially compared to europe, it was like story telling is what hollywood did better than anybody else and we're the worst at it now. what i mean, most movies that you see at the theaters, they set up the situation within the first 15 minutes and that's it. the rest of the movie is living up to that premise. that's not a story. it can be entertaining, like you look at a movie like "speed" and they live up to their situation. a story is supposed to be unfolding. you aren't supposed to know everything there is to know in the first 15, 20 minutes. we are probably around the same age. when we were kids, you wouldn't even go to the beginning of the movie. your parents would take you to see the movie and come in another. see the next movie and stay to watch up to the point that you came in at. and a all the time when we would see the beginning of the film, how did they get there from here? this is so different from our middle -- from where we came in at and eeptly that would meet up. that's not happe
lost in america, used to bespecially compared to europe, it was like story telling is what hollywood did better than abody else and we're the wst at it now. what i mean, most movies tt you e at the theaters, they set uphe situation withinhe first 15 mines and that's it. the rest of th movie i livg up to tt premise. that's not a sto. it can bentertaining,ike you look at a movie like "speed" and th live up to theisituation. a story is supposed to be unfolding. you aren't suppose to know everythi there is to know in the fit 15, 20 minutes. are probably arnd the same age. when we were kid you wouldn't even go to the binning of the movie. your pents would take you to see the moviend come in another. see the xt moviend stay to watch u to the pnt that you came in at. and a all the time when we would seehe beginning of the film, how d they get there om here? this iso differentrom our middle -- from where we cam in at and eeptly that wld meet up. that's n happening anymore. i'm committing to tling a story. and that it is unfoldi. you don't knowverything there is to know until deep, deep into
andhere we were wrg. does your religion make you passed a health care bill so all of the pele in america so they can have the same bl that they have in congress? i don't care about your eology, you can cll yourself rit, rigious, left. if your religion does n push you to think of the golden rule, then something is wrong. vis: that sounds like a love to me. >>all right, ok. tavis: the new book called hose gospel." thiswas a rather concise conversation with dr. forbes. good to have you. >> my pleasure. tavis: that's the show. thank you for watching keep the fai. >> for more information on toy's show, visit tavis smey on pbs. tavis: join me next time with eugene jarecki onhe banks. >> there are soany things that wal-mart is loing forward to doing like hpingpeople live better. mostly we e looking forward to building strong third communities and retionships. with your help, theest iset to come. >> tionwide insuranc supports tavis smiley. we are wking to impve financia literacy and the economic empowment that comes with it. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewersike you. thank
is beg driven by the middle. everyday peoplin middle america. not ing driven by nework. what do you makeof tt? >> as long as i've been in this business, when they sh you that little grapin the numbers, i ptend like i know at they are talking about. yeah, i see there ia 69 in that thing there? that's gat. esome. i don't know. you know, i totally g towards what makes me proud. you know, makes me feel li it is a b middle fger to everyone w said i couldn't do it because i hope there is a bunch of girls and ladies behind me that are wanting to the sa thing and betr that i need to they pat for. so many womedid it for me. our job. tavis: youot to admit that is pretty cool. >> kinof cool. [laughter] if i may gloat. tavis: youan gloat. you have earned it. spking of the numbers, let talk about the other mie, "the proposal." don't know what to askbout this movie bause there is thr has been so much talk abo "the bld side." were the things planned to come out at the same time? >> everyone saiou have done much work this year. i said no it is over t years. they just both decided to com out. in "t
first year, it is that america is perceived very differentlyn europe and i think in the muslim world, the cairo speech and other speech hes gave began to reach out to the musm world in aay that i ink no other amerin president has. the probm he faces on the foreign fro is that 2010 now has to be the yearf delivebles. that'sifficult. he reaed out to ira and the irania didn't reach back. he's committed 30,000 americ troops, plus another0 that he did earlier i his term,o ghanistan. but weon't know until the middle of this year the earliest whether that's turning the tide. >> i heard you suggest, just a few moments ago, that you don't think personally as the chief washington correspondent for the new york timesyou don't feel that he spent oo little time on the enomy, but ttoesn't - that doesn'tquare well with the lls and surveys'm reading about whathe american people think,avid. >> that'right. the's also a difference between the amount of time tha as reporte we see a president focus something and the perction about what he i taing. . d i think that my whore -- who watch the president co
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)